Review

Clean Code – Uncle Bob / Lesson 1

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↓↓ ENGLISH DESCRIPTION ↓↓
“Coding Better World Together” is a set of master lessons from the famous Uncle Bob (Robert Cecil Martin), where he gives us a broad vision of the importance and future of Software in today’s society.

In this first lesson, Uncle Bob demonstrates the need to write a clean code and establishes the bases to achieve it, being these bases of a social and scientific nature. Making it clear that the future of programming is based on an ethical and polite code.

↓↓ DESCRIPCION EN ESPAÑOL ↓↓
“Coding Better World Together” es un conjunto de lecciones magistrales del famoso tío Bob (Robert Cecil Martin), donde nos brinda una visión amplia de la importancia y el futuro del software en la sociedad actual.

En esta primera lección, el tío Bob demuestra la necesidad de escribir un código limpio y establece las bases para lograrlo, siendo estas bases de naturaleza social y científica. Dejando en claro que el futuro de la programación se basa en un código ético y cortés.

0:00 Event Presentation
2:03 Presenter Introduces Uncle Bob
3:41 Uncle Bob Introduction / My Tribe
4:49 How Far is the Sun?
10:52 Introduction to Clean Code
12:21 The current Society works with Software
19:47 Volkswagen case / Introduction to the Ethics of Software Development
24:28 Why are Programmers so slow?
32:13 What is a Clean Code?
40:09 Analyzing some lines of code
43:43 Long code is not Good Code
49:25 Good Code / Refactored Function
52:40 Polite Code / Rules for writing a news paper article
55:25 Shrunk Code / The Rules of Functions
1:00:23 Shrunk Code / Drawing a Function
1:05:36 When and why was Java invented?
1:08:52 Prose Code / Arguments
1:16:13 Avoid Switch Statements / Problems and Evolution of some programming languages
1:26:15 The Uncle Bob’s wife message (funny moment)
1:27:22 Output Arguments No Side Effects / Garbage Collection
1:32:21 No Side Effects / Using Lambda
1:34:26 No Side Effects / Command and Query Separation
1:35:30 No Side Effects / Prefer Exceptions to returning error codes
1:37:05 DRI Principle (Don’t Repeat Yourself)
1:39:21 Structured Programming / Edsger Dijkstra Vision vs Actual Vision of the programming
1:45:32 Science and Correct Software

↓↓ OUR MODEL OF SOCIETY ↓↓

↓↓ NUESTRO MODELO DE SOCIEDAD ↓↓

↓↓ OUR CRIPTOCURRENCY FOR MONETARY FREEDOM – NUESTRA CRIPTOMONEDA PARA LA LIBERTAD MONETARIA ↓↓

– PRESENTATION:

↓↓ OUR PAYMENT FRANCHISE – NUESTRA FRANQUICIA DE PAGOS ↓↓

↓↓ OUR SOCIAL PACT – NUESTRO PACTO SOCIAL ↓↓

– PRESENTATION:

↓↓ OUR SOCIAL NETWORKS – NUESTRAS REDES SOCIALES↓↓
– Facebook:
– Twitter:

Tag: clean code, programming, software, clean code, polite code, shrunk code, programming language, computing, technology, society, ethics, human relations, uncle bob, robert cecil martin, edsger dijkstra, grady booch, future, rules, java, c#, c++, microsoft, functions, declarations, arguments, cycle, kotlin, InteliJ, methodology, agile, scrum, tdd, test driven development, programmer, responsibility, expectations, architecture, design, development, applications, app, structure, web, study, practice, optimization, productivity, purpose

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44 Comments

  1. 0:00 Event Presentation
    2:03 Presenter Introduces Uncle Bob
    3:41 Uncle Bob Introduction / My Tribe
    4:49 How Far is the Sun?
    10:52 Introduction to Clean Code
    12:21 The current Society works with Software
    19:47 Volkswagen case / Introduction to the Ethics of Software Development
    24:28 Why are Programmers so slow?
    32:13 What is a Clean Code?
    40:09 Analyzing some lines of code
    43:43 Long code is not Good Code
    49:25 Good Code / Refactored Function
    52:40 Polite Code / Rules for writing a news paper article
    55:25 Shrunk Code / The Rules of Functions
    1:00:23 Shrunk Code / Drawing a Function
    1:05:36 When and why was Java invented?
    1:08:52 Prose Code / Arguments
    1:16:13 Avoid Switch Statements / Problems and Evolution of some programming languages
    1:26:15 The Uncle Bob's wife message (funny moment)
    1:27:22 Output Arguments No Side Effects / Garbage Collection
    1:32:21 No Side Effects / Using Lambda
    1:34:26 No Side Effects / Command and Query Separation
    1:35:30 No Side Effects / Prefer Exceptions to returning error codes
    1:37:05 DRI Principle (Don't Repeat Yourself)
    1:39:21 Structured Programming / Edsger Dijkstra Vision vs Actual Vision of the programming

    Reply
  2. Can someone help me understand what's so brilliant about Bob?

    Most of the concepts are given too much importance, these things are basic, as basic as "does it make sense to clean my hands after I've been to the toilet?" and others are just conditional/dogmatic.

    From my experience most of the times "Clean code" (the book) or "Design Patterns" (different authors but same concerns) are brought up are by undergraduates who sign up for internship, and usually it's not the case that they have found much knowledge in these books but because others have told them that these books are read by people who are "good programmers". So my guess is the case that Bob and "the great 5" are authors whose audience are beginners. I know I was confused about how to approach solving a problem as a beginner because I lacked creativity and code sense, but this is something that you cannot teach. In fact, many principles taught in "Clean code/Clean architecture/Design patterns" are complete opposite to creative/critical thinking. It's an attempt at describing the "best way" to do things without understanding, therefore suited for beginners who don't know where to go.

    Reply
  3. Uncle Bob,

    Thank you very much for making me a better developer. After watching your lectures and reading your books, I have realised how horrible I was (I still am I think).

    I am happy that Java has given us features such as try with resource (that handles closing opened resources automatically). If we install Static code analysers such as SonarLint, it just forces us to use this style and also offers hints on how to make the code better in general.

    I think the IDEs and tools that we have today almost force us to write better code (if not the perfect code). The tool vendors probably were strongly inspired by you to build them and that has changed the way we program.

    Reply
  4. "You and I probably don't realize it very well–just how dependent everything is on software."

    C'mon, the entire world heard this message ad nauseum 20+ years ago re: Y2K.

    Reply
  5. Don't waste your time on this. I'm sure those 2 airliners that crashed in Africa killing hundreds of people had clean code too. Good code is reliable code, and that depends on good architecture. Not pretty text structure.

    Reply
  6. Fuck*ng shitty operator! Why the fu*k is he switches angles back-and-forth while Bob is drawing something on the IPad? It is not fuc*ing movie!

    Reply
  7. loved 31:54 .. " You are not done when it works , you are done when it's right" . I must say he really makes you look at programming with a different lens . Thanks for sharing this

    Reply
  8. Uncle Bob, an astronomical unit is not the distance between the earth and the sun it is the distance between the earth and the CENTER of the sun. Something to note.

    Reply
  9. Im getting so angry watching this at 52 min in.
    40 min waste of my time, who edited this video? When he talks about a dot show me the dot and not his face! i dont need a closeup of him puting his water in the glass wow! Why not show the code in that time that everyone else in the room is currently analyzing seriously!?

    Reply
  10. 1:14:24 "another thing that is rude is output arguments"
    ah, you mean like includeSetupAndTeardownPages(pageData)? conflicting messages is the best way to teach I guess.
    (not to hate on all of it though, this talk is good)

    Reply
  11. Thankfully this is on youtube with the ability to pause, if you feel the need to! But most important is what he says about it. This is not a test, but fantastic inspiration with super helpful observations. Enjoyed it tremendously!

    Reply

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